Polish Desserts and Sweets - top 22 desserts from Poland (2022)

Here comes a list of modern and traditional Polish desserts and sweets. Under their descriptions, you can find some authentic recipes. Going to visit Poland? Would you like to taste some delicious foods not choosing on spec? You are welcome. All Polish foods listed below constitute a typical Polish menu even today. Therefore, while visiting Poland, one will certainly come across many of them. I wish you good luck in exploring Polish tastes and… Smacznego!

Paczki • Polish donuts

in Polish: pączek (singular), pączki (plural)

Paczki are one of the most typical sweet snacks you can buy in a Polish store. Paczki are a round spongy yeast cake stuffed with one of many fillings like: rose or strawberry preserves, liqueur, budyn (Polish pudding/blancmange, see below), sweet curd cheese or chocolate. This Polish dessert is fried on deep oil until it reaches a dark, golden color and is served topped with powdered sugar, icing sugar or chocolate. Also, it is oftentimes sprinkled with orange peel. Paczki are one of the most traditional Polish desserts; they appeared in Poland during the time of King Augustus III of Poland (first half of 18th century). The word paczki is plural, its singular equivalent is paczek.

In Poland, there is a strong and pleasant tradition of eating paczki on last Thursday of the carnival. This day is a so-called 'fat Thursday' ('tlusty czwartek' in Polish language). Statistically, every year the Poles consume 100 million paczki in a course of this one day only. A superstition says, that if anyone does not eat a single paczek, they will be unlucky all year long. In the past a baker who had prepared paczki, hid an almond or a nut in some of them. Poles believed that the one who finds one of these paczki, is going to be lucky all their life.

Polish 'Fat Thursday', which is the Thursday before Ash Wednesday, should not be confused with a so-called 'Fat Tuesday'. Fat Tuesday, better known as Mardi Gras is a tradition cultivated in Belgium, Netherlands, Sweden and some parts of United States and Canada. Interestingly enough, Fat Tuesday is also known in Germany, and in the same time Germany is the only country that shares the tradition of Fat Thursday with Poland :)

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"Paczki have been known in Poland at least since the Middle Ages. Although they look like bismarcks or jelly doughnuts, paczki are made from especially rich dough containing eggs, fats, sugar and sometimes milk. They feature a variety of fruit and creme fillings and can be glazed, or covered with granulated or powdered sugar. Powidla (stewed plum jam, powidl) and wild rose hip jam are traditional fillings, but many others are used as well, including strawberry, Bavarian cream, blueberry, custard, raspberry and apple." — Wikipedia

Sernik • Cheesecake

in Polish: as above

  • Unbaked cheesecake with digestive biscuit base and jelly topping

Cheesecake is one of the most popular desserts in Poland. A sweet curd cheese is its main ingredient. There are many kinds of sernik, different in composition, taste and way of preparation. The best known is a cheesecake baked in the oven and made on a layer of a crumbly cake, although there are also cheesecakes prepared without baking. In most cases raisins, fruits, a crumble topping or chocolate sauce are stock additions. Quite an original example of this Polish dessert is a delicious sernik made from a sponge cake and cream cheese, and covered with fruit and jelly. This type of cake is dished up cold.

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Makowiec • Poppy-seed cake / loaf

in Polish: as above

Poppy-seed cake, also known as poppy seed loaf, is a traditional Polish dessert – a yeast cake stuffed with ground poppy. Some raisins, almonds or walnuts are the most typical additions. The baked cake is decorated with icing and (usually) orange peel.

In the distant times this poppy-seed cake was a traditional dessert prepared for Easter and Christmas. In the Christian tradition poppy, containing thousand of seeds in one poppy head, is a symbol of harvest and fertility. Therefore, in the past, the Poles and other Slavs believed that eating poppy-seed cake during the holidays will bring them luck in life.

(Video) 5 Polish Cakes and Pastries - Try most delicious Polish cakes in Warsaw!

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Piernik • Gingerbread

in Polish: as above

Gingerbread is a well-known aromatic cake with a very intense and characteristic taste. It is a little hard and has a dark-brown color. This Polish cake is made from wheat and rye flour, milk, eggs, caramelized sugar and honey. Cinnamon, ginger, cloves, cardamom, nutmeg, anise and lavender are usually used for adding flavor. In Poland, piernik is sold in a form of a big lump of a cake, or as a package of small cookies usually covered with chocolate and filled with fruit preserves, nut mass or marzipan.

The gingerbread was a traditional cake of Hanseatic cities. Hence it is known not only in Poland, but also in Germany, Netherlands, Russia, and in Scandinavian countries. Piernik became popular in 18th century in Poland and, just like in other countries, it initially was a symbol of prosperity and a high social status. This luxury character of the dessert was a consequence of very high price of spices. Although gingerbread is normally considered a dessert, crumbled piernik is an ingredient of a traditional Old Polish grey sauce.

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Kluski z makiem • Pasta with poppy-seed

in Polish: as above

  • Kluski z makiem - pasta with poppy recipe

Kluski z makiem is a traditional sweet Polish dessert dish. Pasta with poppy-seed is usually eaten during Christmas. This Polish food consists of kluski (kind of home-made pasta) and poppy mass prepared from ground poppy with an addition of honey, nuts, almonds and other stuff.


Kisiel

in Polish: as above

Kisiel is a sweet, thick fruit dessert. This Polish dessert is usually served hot. However, it is also possible to eat cold kisiel. Kisiel is made with an addition of potato starch which serves as a thickening agent. Although making this Polish dessert on one's own, with use of potato starch, fruit and fruit juice, does not constitute a problem, buying powdered ready-made kisiel is definitely more popular. In Polish stores this dessert is available in many flavors.

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"Kissel or kisel is a popular dessert in Eastern and Northern Europe. It consists of sweetened juice, thickened with arrowroot, cornstarch or potato starch, and sometimes red wine or dried fruits are added." — Wikipedia

Budyn • Pudding

in Polish: budyń

Budyn is a pudding, or blancmange. This Polish dessert is quite similar to kisiel but made of milk instead of water. Polish budyn is also very similar to English sweet puddings. Most often budyn has a vanilla or chocolate taste. This dessert is dished up hot with an addition of juice, fruit, chocolate or toffee icing, or with some nuts and raisins. Some people concoct salted blancmange made from mushrooms or vegetables.

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Faworki aka chrust • Angel wings

in Polish: faworki, chrust

(Video) Poland's DESSERTS are AMAZING!! (Trying Polish desserts in Warsaw, Poland)

Polish dessert faworki also appears under names such as chrust or jaworki. It is a traditional Polish delicacy made from a sweet crisp cake in a shape of a bow. Oftentimes faworki are eaten on the last Thursday of the carnival (the so-called tlusty czwartek, which means fat Thursday) and before Ash Wednesday. A lot of yolk is used in the production of the dough. It must be quite well aerated, which requires intensive and long kneading and bumping. Faworki are cut out of a lump and then fried in deep oil.

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Babka wielkanocna • Polish easter cake

in Polish: as above

Baba or babka wielkanocna is a simple Slavic yeast cake dished up during Easter. This dessert is well-known to many Slavs as well as Lithuanians. After baking the cake babka is iced with icing, or with rose or orange water. There are few kinds of babka wielkanocna. A special kind of this Polish cake is a so-called sekacz - a tree cake baked on a rotary spit (see below).

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Sekacz • Tree cake

in Polish: sękacz

Polish sekacz – a tree cake is a sponge cake baked above a flame on a rotary spit. Originally, sekacz was a traditional Tartar cake. Later in history it has become popular on the Polish Eastern Borderlands. Today in Poland, sekacz is recognized by the Poles as a regional specialty of the Podlasie region. This delicious Polish cake can be covered with icing or chocolate, but oftentimes is eaten plain, without any addition or decoration.

The name of this dessert comes from its distinctive appearance. As a result of pouring the spit with layers of dough, the thick layers of this bright cake are striped with some dark and thin layers of scorched cake, which are visible in a cross-section ofthis Polish tree cake. That appearance resembles the growth rings in the trunk of a tree. Polish word sekacz is derived from sek, which means knot.

In our times a tradition of baking various forms of tree cake is preserved in many European countries: Switzerland, France, Romania, Hungary, Lithuania, Sweden, Poland and in central Germany (where it is known as Baumkuchen or Prugelkrapfen). Interestingly enough, this tree cake became one of the favorite cakes in Japan.

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Mazurek • Shortcrust tart baked at Easter

in Polish: as above

Mazurek is a simple traditional Polish cake baked for Easter. It can be generally described in English language as a shortcrust tart. The characteristic features of this Polish cake, which will allow you to recognize it forthwith, is the cake's low height – only 1-2 centimeters; its decoration – quite excessive and kitschy (it is intended that way!); and its sweetness – although it is not a rule, a mazurek is usually remarkably sweet, and this is why it is cut into small squares (it is usually impossible to eat too much of it at once).

There are various kinds of Polish mazurek made from different dough: brittle, sponge, marzipan-dough and a so-called makaronikowe dough. The dough is interlaid with a nut mass, preserves or a jam. The surface of the mazurek is decorated with icing, chocolate, krowka type toffee (see below), dried or fresh fruit, almonds, nuts and raisins.

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Kutia

in Polish: as above

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Kutia is a peculiar, traditional dish known in Ukrainian, Belarussian, Lithuanian and Eastern Polish cuisine. It is one of the 12 dishes traditionally served during Christmas Eve supper by Eastern Slavs. Kutia is a blend of wheat grains, poppy, malt, honey and a so-called bakalie: various nuts, raisins, and some other additions. In our times, almonds or candied orange peel are also used. On account of a large content of grains of wheat kutia seems to be quite a special dish - eating or rather chewing it takes some time. This traditional Polish dessert cannot simply just be swallowed down at once.


Krowki • 'Little cows' candies

in Polish: krówka (singular), krówki (plural)

Krowki, what can be translated into English as little cows, are Polish milk candies. Krowki are made of a peculiar mass, something similar to toffee. These Polish sweets are soft, unusually ductile and gluing palate and teeth together. That is where an unofficial name of candies comes from – mordoklejki what means puss gluing. An interesting and characteristic feature is a fact that with a passage of time krowki harden from the outside. Fresh krowki are malleable in their entire volume (see photo below). With the passing of time, however, they start to crumble, as a result of sugar crystallization.

Krowki were invented in the first half of the 20th century by Polish confectioner Feliks Pomorski. the candies were wrapped up in pieces of paper with a picture of a cow, which later rendered the name 'little cows' popular, and used even nowadayson account of this traditional packaging.

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" Krowki (plural; Krowka singular), literally 'little cows', are Polish fudge, semi-soft milk toffee candies. It is one of the most common Polish confectioneries, sold worldwide" — Wikipedia

Sliwki w czekoladzie • Chocolate-coated plums

in Polish: śliwka w czekoladzie, śliwki (plural) w czekoladzie

Chocolate-covered plums are traditional Polish candies, produced for many, many years. An entire plum covered with some kind of cocoa mass and covered with chocolate icing makes up for the heart of the candy. Yum-yum! Polish chocolate-coated plums in a decorative packaging make a great gift.

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Ptasie mleczko • Bird's milk

in Polish: as above

Ptasie mleczko, which means 'bird's milk' is sweet light milk mousse, with a very delicate taste. This Polish sweet is covered with chocolate icing. In general the mousse has a vanilla, fruit or chocolate flavor. Ptasie mleczko is recognized as one of traditional Polish desserts and sweets. Bird's milk has been produced for many decades by E.Wedel's company located in Warsaw. Nowadays, other companies as well try to make ptasie mleczko for the Polish market, e.g. Milka / Kraft Foods sells this product under a name 'Alpine milk' (Alpejskie Mleczko).

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"Ptasie mleczko, which translates as 'bird's milk' is a soft chocolate-covered candy filled with soft meringue (or milk soufflé). In Poland, E. Wedel Company first developed its ptasie mleczko in the 1930s." — Wikipedia

Panska skorka • Lordly skin

in Polish: pańska skórka

Panska skorka (literal translation: 'a lordly skin') is a traditional Polish white-pink home-made candy, wrapped up in a piece of paper and sold mainly in Warsaw during the All Saints' Day and church fetes. In Cracow miodek turecki ('Turkish honey') fulfills a similar role. The name is given bythe glassy surface of the candy. Panska skorka is related to Turkish Delight (in Poland known as rachatlukum).


Kukulki • Cuckoos

in Polish: kukułki

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Kukulki are traditional Polish sweets produced for years. Cuckoos have a hard, glazed coating with a great alcoholic filling. Kukulki contain 1.5% of spirit, so you have to be careful. It is also interesting that there is a Polish recipe for a delicious liqueur made from these sweets.

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Cukierki czekoladowe or praliny • Chocolates

in Polish: as above

If you go to Poland and want to taste local chocolates, I whole-heartedly can recommend you some. Let me start from the most traditionally Polish ones. Kasztanki (those in an orange foil, see the photo below) are large chocolates with a very specific cocoa/nut filling, covered with dessert chocolate. You can find many little crunchy specks inside this Polish chocolate (as I suppose, some kind of a hard wafer). Malaga (wrapped in a silver foil) are one of my favorite delicious chocolates with a semi-liquid filling containing plum slices. It is hard to tell you more about the taste of Malaga chocolates, since I have never eaten anything like them. Equally traditional, though definitely more down-to-earth and ordinary, there are Michalki chocolates with a cocoa filling.

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Last but not least we have got Trufle and a collection of chocolates by Mieszko company worth mentioning. Trufle are another delicious candies with a peculiar alcoholic filling. These aren't traditional Polish delicacies, but perfect tastes make me to believe that these Polish chocolates deserve the most sincere recommendation. The chocolates wrapped in a red piece of paper (by Mieszko) are morello cherries in a liqueur, whereas the ones in brown paper are stuffed with a filling made of brandy and orange.

Of course the choice I've made above is subjective, but I go for the wager that you also would like a taste of the majority of these chocolates.


Prince Polo

Prince Polo is a simple but very tasty Polish chocolate wafer. It is sold in Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Lithuania, Latvia and Ukraine under a name Siesta. In Iceland it is well-known as Prins Póló. For many years, in Communist Poland, Prince Polo had been a bestselling chocolate wafer and its popularity did not diminish even nowadays. Prince Polo was produced for the first time in 1955, in early years of the Polish People's Republic, by a company called Olza SA. Prince Polo is easy to recognize thanks to its characteristic golden wrapping.

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"Prince Polo is a Polish chocolate bar. It is sold in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Lithuania and Ukraine under the name Siesta, and is also sold in Iceland, where it's known as 'Prins Póló'. Prince Polo was introduced in 1955, during the early years of the Polish People's Republic. It was for many years one of the few chocolate bars available in the country. It has long been Poland's top-selling candy brand." — Wikipedia

Sezamki • Sesame snaps

in Polish: as above

Sesame snaps are bars made of sesame mixed with a tough caramel which are well-known (not only in Poland). A very tasty, simple and fast snack. Produced by E. Wedel for several dozen years.

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Galaretka • Polish jelly

in Polish: as above

Glaretka (or galaretki), which simply means jelly, is another relic of the Communism. A simple product made of colorful fruit jellies sprinkled with sugar. Galaretka is semi-crumbly, in contrast with well-known jellies produced by Haribo. It is not a refined product, but quite traditionally Polish. Today however, thepopularity of galaretka is definitely lower than 20-30 years ago, because of wide access to a huge diversity of other Polish sweets. If you like jelly, you will love galaretka.

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Kogel mogel aka Kogiel mogiel

in Polish: as above

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Kogiel-mogiel or kogel-mogel is a simple dessert prepared from raw yolks and sugar. It turned up in Poland in the 17th century, and is probably Jewish in origin. Kogiel-mogiel was particularly popular under Communism, when sweets were not readily available. This type of dessert is also known in Germany, Russia, and Israel.

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"An egg-based homemade dessert popular in Eastern Europe made from egg yolks, sugar, and flavourings such as chocolate or vodka. In its classic form it is served slightly chilled or at room temperature. Served warm, it is considered a home remedy for sore throats." — Wikipedia

FAQs

What is the most popular dessert in Poland? ›

Sernik (Polish Cheesecake)

Cheesecake is one of the most popular desserts in Poland, a mixture of old Christian and Jewish traditions. Sernik is primarily made of twaróg, a type of fresh curd cheese, a common ingredient of Polish desserts.

What is the popular cake of Poland? ›

Wuzetka is a traditional Polish cake originating from Warsaw. The cake consists of chocolate sponge cake that's filled with whipped cream and covered with chocolate icing. It's usually made with a combination of flour, eggs, sugar, butter, cocoa powder, whipping cream, rum, gelatin, and plum jam.

Is Baklava a Polish dessert? ›

The pre-Ottoman origin of the dish is unknown, but, in modern times, it is a common dessert of Turkish, Iranian and Arab cuisines, and other countries of the Levant and Maghreb, along with the South Caucasus, Balkans, and Central Asia.

What is Poland famous for? ›

Poland is known for being the home of delicious pierogi, former pope John Paul II, and Europe's most ancient old-growth forest. It is also a country rich in unique history and stunning geography, from the Tatra mountains to the Baltic Sea. Read on below for some of the most crucial things to know about Poland!

What food is Poland famous for? ›

Pierogi. Pierogi are filled dumplings containing either meat, vegetables, cheese, fruit or chocolate. Pierogi is undoubtedly Poland's most famous and simple comfort food.

What candy is Polish? ›

Krówki. The popular Polish krówka candy is made from a creamy caramel mix of milk, butter, and sugar. These simple ingredients are stirred and boiled, then poured out and cooled.

Does Poland have a desert? ›

No, it's not a mirage: there really is a desert in the middle of Poland. The Bledow desert – or, as some prefer to call it, the Polish Sahara – has been flummoxing visitors for centuries.

What traditional baked goods are made in Poland? ›

Polish Paczki (Doughnuts)

But these decadent fried cakes also appear ​on special occasions throughout the year. Pączki are made out of a yeast dough that is fried and can be filled with fruit preserves or compotes, sweet cheese, or left hollow and simply rolled in sugar.

What is a typical Polish breakfast? ›

8:30 – 'Śniadanie' (breakfast)

Poles often start the day with meat or eggs. They commonly have what they call 'a sandwich', meaning a slice of bread topped with cold cuts or kiełbasa, or scrambled eggs. There can also be a side of dairy – either kefir, or quark cheese mixed with radishes.

What is Polish coffee cake? ›

It's a yeast cake, but don't get freaked, this is probably one of the simplest cakes you will ever make. It's lightly sweetened, a little lemon rind is added, then it rises. The star of this cake is the crumb topping.

What is Polish baking? ›

Poolish is a highly fluid yeast-cultured dough. It's a type of pre-ferment traditionally used in the production of French bakery products. A Poolish resembles a sponge for the sponge and dough system.

What is Poland's national dish? ›

Bigos stew is the national dish of Poland. It can be made with any kind of meat from pork to rabbit or venison, but should always have spicy Polish sausage.

What are 5 interesting facts about Poland? ›

11 facts about Poland that you won't believe
  • Poland is home to the world's biggest castle. ...
  • Poland has one of the world's oldest salt mines. ...
  • Vodka originated in Poland. ...
  • Europe's heaviest animals live in Poland. ...
  • Poland had the world's first upside down house. ...
  • Poland has one of the most diverse environments in Europe.
Aug 22, 2021

What are Polish woman like? ›

Polish wives are caring and compassionate, which is exactly what you want from a life partner. Moreover, women in Poland have a strong focus on starting a family, and by the time they meet their future husband, they are fully ready to settle down.

What kind of food is Polish? ›

Polish cuisine is rich in meat, especially pork, chicken and game, in addition to a wide range of vegetables, spices, mushrooms, and herbs. It is also characteristic in its use of various kinds of noodles as well as cereals and grains.

How old is Poland? ›

Poland's first civilization dates back to about 2000 B.C., but it wasn't until A.D. 966 that the region's tribes became united under the Slavic chief Mieszko, first prince of Polska. In the late 1500s, Poland and Lithuania joined together and formed a large, powerful commonwealth with elected kings.

What chocolate is from Poland? ›

Ciocolata, czokulada, czokolta, czykulata – today it's simply called czekolada and available everywhere.

Is Poland known for chocolate? ›

Chocolate wafers have been popular in Poland for decades, retaining their appeal long after the fall of communism. Arguably the most famous of these chocolate bars is the iconic Prince Polo, which Poles first became acquainted with back in 1955.

What do you mean by Polish? ›

1a : a smooth glossy surface : luster. b : freedom from rudeness or coarseness : culture. c : a state of high development or refinement. 2 : the action or process of polishing. 3 : a preparation that is used to produce a gloss and often a color for the protection and decoration of a surface furniture polish nail polish.

How many deserts are in Poland? ›

Pustynia Bledowska, also dubbed the 'Polish Sahara' is the only genuine desert-like area not only in Poland, but in Europe. Surprisingly, this 12-square-mile sand stretch of unique desert qualities is just an hour drive away from Krakow. The legend has it, that the desert was created from the Baltic Sea sand.

Is Poland flat or hilly? ›

Topographically, Poland is a diverse country; although most of the central terrain is flat, there is an abundance of lakes, rivers, hills, swamps, beaches, islands and forests elsewhere.

Does Poland have camels? ›

Farmers in the village of Sanie, southern Poland, breed camels not for meat or wool but for their milk, that they claim is “way more beneficial than cow milk”. The farm breeds Camelus Dromedarius, one-humped camels. Currently the owners are in possession of as many as 15 animals.

What is on a Polish platter? ›

(come as is) Taste of popular and traditional Polish specialties. Cabbage roll, 4 pierogis, kielbasa and purée potatoes.

What is in a Polish dinner? ›

Polish dishes typically contain meats, sauerkraut, cucumbers, mushrooms, and are flavored with a wide array of herbs and spices. The cuisine might not be as popular as French or Italian, but it deserves the spotlight just as much.

Is Polish food spicy? ›

As medieval chronicles highlight, a typical Polish food is characteristically spicy, with lots of groats, cream, eggs, and meat. Traditional Polish cuisine applied extraordinary amounts of seasoning as compared to other European cuisines. Juniper, nutmeg, and pepper were the mainly preferred food seasonings.

How do you pronounce Paczki donuts? ›

Paczki Pronunciation

Paczki is pronounced as “pohnch-kee” and spelled with an ogonek on the “a” in Polish. Keep in mind that paczki is not pronounced or spelled as "punchkees" as so commonly believed in America. Paczki is the plural form of the word, while the singular form is paczek, which is pronounced “pohnch-eck”.

What are the favorite baked goods eaten in Poland during Carnival season? ›

They are to be found in pastry shops all year round but pączki are a symbol of the end of carnival season. On Fat Thursday, the last day before Lent, tens of millions are consumed. Another famed carnival treat is a sweet crisp pastry made out of ribbon-shaped dough, deep fried and sprinkled with powdered sugar.

What is Polish bread made of? ›

Most Polish bread to be found in these bakeries is made of wheat and rye flour. Don't forget that bread tastes best when covered with good quality butter and some spring onion.

What do Polish people speak? ›

The country's official language, Polish (together with other Lekhitic languages and Czech, Slovak, and Upper and Lower Sorbian), belongs to the West Slavic branch of Slavic languages.

Are Polish religious? ›

Poland is a secular country and freedom of religion is constitutionally ensured regardless of one's faith so long as its practices do not harm others. As of 2017, it is estimated the majority (85.9%) of the population identifies as Catholic Christians.

What is Polish coffee? ›

Poles love their strong black coffee known as czarna , literally the word for “black” or czarna kawa which, in its most extreme form, is equivalent to espresso. Coffee with milk is kawa z mlekiem.

Can Placek be frozen? ›

Store in airtight container at room temperature or wrap and freeze for up to 3 months. Serve slightly warmed or at room temperature with a spread of butter or preserves.

What is a loaf shaped coffee cake called? ›

American coffee cake

They may be loaf-shaped, for easy slicing or baked in a Bundt or tube pan. They may also feature a streusel or simple glaze topping, if any. Streusel is German for "sprinkle" or "strew" and refers to the popular crumbly topping of butter, flour, sugar.

Is Poland Sweden? ›

Poland–Sweden relations are historical and bilateral relations between Poland and Sweden. Both countries are separated by the Baltic Sea and have had a very long historical contact.
...
Poland–Sweden relations.
PolandSweden
Diplomatic mission
Embassy of Poland, StockholmEmbassy of Sweden, Warsaw
4 more rows

How do you spell Barbara in Polish? ›

Barbara is Basia or Baśka, Katarzyna is Kasia/Kaśka, Joanna is Aśka or Asia, or Joaśka. Alicja is Ala.

Why is it called Poolish? ›

This type of leavening process comes from Poland. Its first mention goes back in 1840. It was brought by bakers to France in the 1920's. The term “poolish” comes from the old English “polish”.

What is Poland's liquor? ›

Żubrówka – Poland's finest from Białystok

Last but not least, Żubrówka is the best known Polish booze in the world: you can probably buy it wherever you live since it's available in 80 different countries. Also known as Bison Grass Vodka, it contains a bison grass blade in every bottle.

What alcohol is Polish? ›

Krupnik. Dubbed as the favorite drink in Poland, krupnik is based on a neutral spirit, typically vodka of fruit brandy, which is enriched with honey.

What is Poland national drink? ›

Poland: Like some other central European countries, in Poland vodka is considered to be its national beverage. Along with cereal grains, Poland is also known for distilling it from potatoes.

What is Polish coffee cake? ›

It's a yeast cake, but don't get freaked, this is probably one of the simplest cakes you will ever make. It's lightly sweetened, a little lemon rind is added, then it rises. The star of this cake is the crumb topping.

What is a Polish pastry called? ›

Polish Paczki (Doughnuts)

Pączki are made out of a yeast dough that is fried and can be filled with fruit preserves or compotes, sweet cheese, or left hollow and simply rolled in sugar.

What is Polish coffee? ›

Poles love their strong black coffee known as czarna , literally the word for “black” or czarna kawa which, in its most extreme form, is equivalent to espresso. Coffee with milk is kawa z mlekiem.

Can Placek be frozen? ›

Store in airtight container at room temperature or wrap and freeze for up to 3 months. Serve slightly warmed or at room temperature with a spread of butter or preserves.

What is a loaf shaped coffee cake called? ›

American coffee cake

They may be loaf-shaped, for easy slicing or baked in a Bundt or tube pan. They may also feature a streusel or simple glaze topping, if any. Streusel is German for "sprinkle" or "strew" and refers to the popular crumbly topping of butter, flour, sugar.

Does Poland have a desert? ›

No, it's not a mirage: there really is a desert in the middle of Poland. The Bledow desert – or, as some prefer to call it, the Polish Sahara – has been flummoxing visitors for centuries.

What is Polish baking? ›

Poolish is a highly fluid yeast-cultured dough. It's a type of pre-ferment traditionally used in the production of French bakery products. A Poolish resembles a sponge for the sponge and dough system.

What is a typical Polish breakfast? ›

8:30 – 'Śniadanie' (breakfast)

Poles often start the day with meat or eggs. They commonly have what they call 'a sandwich', meaning a slice of bread topped with cold cuts or kiełbasa, or scrambled eggs. There can also be a side of dairy – either kefir, or quark cheese mixed with radishes.

What is a Polish donut called? ›

Paczki are Polish doughnuts. Usually full of jelly or some kind of sweet filling, they are known to draw lines around the block this time of year.

What is the meaning of Paczki? ›

noun, plural pacz·ki. a traditional Polish doughnut, filled with jam or another sweet filling and covered with powdered sugar or icing.

How do you say Paczki donuts? ›

Paczki Pronunciation

Paczki is pronounced as “pohnch-kee” and spelled with an ogonek on the “a” in Polish. Keep in mind that paczki is not pronounced or spelled as "punchkees" as so commonly believed in America. Paczki is the plural form of the word, while the singular form is paczek, which is pronounced “pohnch-eck”.

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